Restaurants in Hialeah, Key West and Miami briefly closed by state inspectors – Crime and Safety – Sun-Sentinel

Critical violations of state sanitation and safety laws determined by inspectors at three South Florida restaurants last week prompted the Florida Department of Business & Professional Regulation to temporarily close them.

A fourth dining spot in Hialeah was closed for not having a license.

 

Guy Harvey’s Island Grill, at 511 Greene Street in Key West was closed on Sept. 22 with 19 critical violations that included: food/container stored in ice used for drinks; food stored on a freezer floor; soil residue in storage containers; soiled microwave interior; rodent droppings under dishwasher, under soda syrup boxes, food preparation table and cookline; accumulation of dead or trapped birds, insects, rodents or other pests in light coverings in the kitchen area. the restaurant was allowed to reopen Sept. 23 with two critical violations including an unlabeled spray bottle and working containers of food removed from original container and not identified by common name.  Guy Harvey’s Island Grill General Manager mark Shimer declined to comment.

 

La Familia Bar & Restaurant, 2818 N.W. 22nd Avenue, Miami was closed on Sept. 25 with two critical violations for having live roaches in the kitchen. the restaurant was allowed to reopen Sept. 27 with zero critical violations. A message left for the owner was not returned.

Pritikin Longevity Center & Spa, 4400 NW 87th Avenue, (Doral) Miami was closed on Sept. 22 with 16 critical violations that included: rodent droppings in dry storage area; live roaches on and under food preparation table, under vegetable storage table, under preparation sink and cookline, in dry storage, area under computer table in kitchen area. Inspector observed accumulation of dead or trapped birds, insects, rodents or other pests in control devices; observed live flies in kitchen; food debris accumulated on kitchen floor; pesticide stored in food preparation area; expired food manager certification and no proof of required employee training.  the restaurant was allowed to reopen Sept. 23 with zero critical violations. 

Pritikin spokesman Ernie Cox said, “When the situation came to our attention it was discovered in a remote area of the kitchen and storage area. We notified building management who corrected the violations in a matter of hours. We’ve also altered how we bring produce into the building and now re-pack all of our arrivals outside of the kitchen. We were open for the next meal.”

The state closed Boulevard Café of Hialeah at 4311 Palm Avenue for not having a license.  Owner Nancy Pulles did not return a message.

A state spokeswoman says it is not the number of critical violations that will cause a restaurant to be temporarily shut down, but the nature of what an inspector finds that merits closing a business.

After a restaurant is shuttered, an inspector typically visits again within 24 hours or until violations are resolved to allow a business to reopen.  Repeat critical violations can lead to fines of $500 to $1,000 per instance in a future administrative complaint levied by the state.

If a bad dining experience makes you feel ill, it’s easy to complain to the Florida Department of Business & Professional Regulation by calling 850-487-1395, or by filing a report online at MyFloridaLicense.com.

But beware: this isn’t the place for personal vendettas. False reports can lead to misdemeanor charges. 

And if you haven’t checked out a bistro’s inspection history online before making a reservation, state law requires restaurants to provide customers with a copy of the most recent inspection report.

Restaurants in Hialeah, Key West and Miami briefly closed by state inspectors – Crime and Safety – Sun-Sentinel


Related Websites

Be Sociable, Share!