Oceanside Man Says TSA Pat-Down Policy Goes Too Far

SAN DIEGO — An Oceanside man who refused a backscatter check and a pat-down said he believes the TSA’s hands-on approach is too intrusive.John Tyner was supposed to be in South Dakota this weekend on a hunting trip but said his trip ended Saturday morning at Lindbergh field.Tyner, who was traveling with his father and brother-in-law arrived at the airport early Saturday morning. after checking in, they went to the security checkpoint, where Tyner said his trouble started.”I was trying to get into the metal detector line because I just didn’t even want to deal with the backscatter machines at all,” said Tyner, referring to the body scanning machines installed at Lindbergh Field earlier this year.Tyner said that is too much personal privacy to give away just to get on an airplane.”I don’t think that needs to be a condition for people to fly,” he said. “I mean, giving up that level of privacy is not something I’m prepared to do.”However, Tyner was selected to go through one of the backscatter machines. when he refused, Tyner said a TSA agent told him he could have a body pat-down instead.but Tyner said the pat-down was not an acceptable option for him, which he said he made very clear to the TSA agent.”I turned to him, I looked him in the eye and I said, ‘If you touch my junk, I’ll have you arrested,'” he said. “[Then] the supervisor came over… [and] explained the whole process again and I told her, ‘You know, I’m not really comfortable with this. it seems to me it amounts to a sexual assault and I don’t think that should be a condition for getting on the plane.'”Tyner said more TSA agents arrived and encircled him. after some discussion with the agents, Tyner said an agent told him he would be escorted out of the airport.as he was about to leave, Tyner said another person who was described as a senior TSA supervisor had some unwelcome news.”Because I had started the screening process and refused to finish, I was in violation of federal law and he needed me to go back into the screening area and finish the screening process,” said Tyner, who refused. “[Then] the guy threatened me with a federal lawsuit and $10,000 fine and I finally told him I would see him in court and I left the airport.”Tyner told 10News he was not worried about a lawsuit but said he was happy to stand up to authorities and hopes to inspire other travelers to do the same. Tyner also said the airline refunded his entire ticket purchase price.Tyner is now under investigation by the TSA and could face a maximum fine of $11,000.”If they want to sue me, then they know where I am,” Tyner told 10News two days after the incident happened.when asked he thought if Tyner planned the incident to get attention, San Diego TSA security chief Michael Aguilar responded, “I don’t know if it was an actual setup… but we are concerned that the passenger did have his recording taking place prior to entering the checkpoint, so there is some concern that it was an intentional behavior on his part.”Aguilar said both the pat-down search and the body scan are necessary tools to fight terrorists and keep the flying public safe.”The enemy that we’re facing isn’t stagnant, so our procedures continually need to be refined,” he said.since Tyner recorded the incident, Aguilar said the investigation should wrap up quickly.

Oceanside Man Says TSA Pat-Down Policy Goes Too Far


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